Can UV light help save seniors’ lives? Windsor Elms and Northwood part of research study

Susan Hayes, the chief executive officer at the Windsor Elms Village, is looking forward to seeing the results from an in-depth 18-month study on far-UVC light being conducted at the Falmouth-based long-term care facility.
Susan Hayes, the chief executive officer at the Windsor Elms Village, is looking forward to seeing the results from an in-depth 18-month study on far-UVC light being conducted at the Falmouth-based long-term care facility. – Contributed

Scientists want to know if far-UVC light cuts airborne transmission of influenza-like illnesses, respiratory infections and COVID-19 in long-term care

FALMOUTH, N.S. —  Two Nova Scotia nursing homes are about to take part in an 18-month study to help researchers determine if ultraviolet light reduces illness.

With Nova Scotia having the highest per capita population of seniors in the country, researchers say investing in solutions to help long-term care facilities is an important healthy aging strategy here and around the world.

“The pandemic has had a particular impact on older adults, especially those with underlying health conditions,” said lead researcher Dr. Kenneth Rockwood, with Nova Scotia Health’s division of geriatric medicine, in a press release.

“We want to see if far-UVC light can kill airborne viral transmissions, including the SARS CoV-2 virus, in long-term care facilities.”

Northwood’s Halifax campus and Windsor Elms Village in Falmouth are both taking part in the study. The researchers hope to determine if the rates of influenza-like illnesses and respiratory infections decrease due to the far-UVC light…continued